Tewkesbury Buildings and Places

These articles are about specific buildings and places in Tewkesbury. They are divided into the three principle streets, High Street, Church Street and Barton Street; the alley's and courts connecting them and finally places elsewhere in the vicinity.

We hope to have deeds on every house eventually!

Buildings and places on the High Street, Tewkesbury

The Anchor Inn


For centuries Tewkesbury was an important market town situated at the confluence of the Rivers Avon and Severn, although it was not until 1826 that the ferries crossing the Severn were replaced by a bridge. During the age of the horse, apart from ...

114 High Street


This Archive starts in 1726 with the property being owned by John Mansell of Evesham, a baker selling it to Henry Welsh (otherwise Welch) of Tewkesbury, a maltster for £200. In May 1737 Henry Welsh mortgaged for £200 - A parcel of ...

117-118 High Street


The papers within this Accession No. show that originally the property was part of the estate of Sir William Codrington who devised in his Will of 1789 to the use of Sir Christopher Bethell Codrington as 1st tenant for life - with it being lawful ...

43-44 High Street


The Documents and papers within this accession no. show that these houses were originally part of an estate of William Ridler and his wife. In 1708 the estate consisting of houses in Key Lane [ 6 tenants named] and a parcel of meadow called ...

Tudor House Hotel


Tewkesbury is a living museum with more than five hundred years of architecture, and was listed by the Council of British Archaeology as one of fifty-one historic towns which are ‘so splendid and so precious that the ultimate responsibility for them ...

Buildings and places on Church Street, Tewkesbury

86 Church Street


The Tewkesbury Poor book of 1801 lists a Joseph Bishop as living here, paying $5 10s rent and 5s 6d rates. This house is a Georgian building and is about eight feet wide. The 1801 Tewkesbury Poor Book states a Joseph Bishop lived here paying £5 10s ...

89-90 Church Street and the Vaulted Cellar Beneath


There are two doorways in the cellar, but both have been bricked up. That on the road side has early sandstone door pillars and a carved lintel; above this was the normal entrance from the road, similar to other Church Street properties. The stones at the ...

91-92 Church Street - The Old Curiosity Shop


Tourism in Tewkesbury clearly benefits from the buildings featured in the novels of Charles Dickens, Mrs. Craik and John Moore‘s ‘Brensham Trilogy ', based on Tewkesbury and the surrounding area. Researchers, however, can only ...

82-83 Church Street


An exceptionally fine and well-preserved medieval town house. Pair of houses in row. Late C15 or early C16. Late C16/17 rear wing, extended late C18/C19. Close studded framing with plaster infill to front, heavy box framing elsewhere, brick underbuild; ...

The Old Hat Shop


The Hat Shop in Church Street, one of the old houses in Tewkesbury which has often been drawn and photographed, is older than it seems. On the street front it is apparently a later seventeenth century timber-framed building. At the side, over the archway ...

Buildings and places on Barton Street, Tewkesbury

77 Barton Street


Visitors walking down the alleys which run from Barton Street to the Swilgate may sometimes pause to wonder how they came by their names. One such alley is Compton's, by the side of 'The Wool Basket', the shop which now occupies 77, Barton Street. It ...

3 Barton Street


At an auction in Tewkesbury earlier this year an item in the catalogue was described as ‘Sundry Deeds ’. It turned out to be a box of documents relating to No. 3 Barton Street. Having attended most of the local auctions, I was unhappy at missing ...

Tewkesbury's Alleys and Courts

Charlwood's and Long's Alleys


In about 1744, John Wesley first came to Tewkesbury and preached, it is said, under a large elm tree in Perry Hill Field. After that, a room was hired in Long’s Alley, and according to John Rogers this became two adjoining cottages, as a meeting place ...

Wall's Court


One of the best loved alleys in Tewkesbury, Wall’s Court runs from the High St, by the Nottingham Arms, to Oldbury Road. Mr Wall was a tailor, a ‘respectable man’, who occupied the front house two hundred years ago.  As the ‘Court’ name implies,...

Scott's Alley


The High Street entrance to Scott’s Alley was closed off and it became a court in about 1886. It was then entered only from Oldbury Road. This remained the case until the late 1950s when the remaining cottages were demolished and Sweets ...

Wilkes' Alley


A victim of 1960’s redevelopment, Wilkes’s alley originally ran from the High St to the riverside. Most of it disappeared when the Hanover Court flats were built on Back of Avon. All that is left is a short section from the High Street through the front ...

Bank Alley


There isn’t a lot left of Bank Alley, unless you look carefully. A starting point is the doorway to the left of the Hat shop, the one with ‘1664’ carved into the wood above the entrance. If you peer through the gate which closes it, the alley name can be ...

Turner's Court


Turner’s Court, off Church Street, is shorter than the alleys in the High Street or Barton Street, but no less interesting for that. Despite the ‘Court’ name, it’s a public right of way, having been adopted as such in 1929. The residents had petitioned ...

Stephen's Alley


Stephens’ Alley is opposite the Black Bear, and the last alley along the High Street.  Mr Stephens was a hosier, and the alley contained his business. There were six occupied cottages in 1905, but had been more. Some had been converted to other ...

Fish Alley


Fish Alley runs from Barton Street to Swilgate Road, or ‘Back of Swilgate’ as it was known before street signs. It is one of a series of alleys which used to run between these two streets, several of which remain, though the warren of courts and yards ...

Warder's Alley


Warder’s Alley is one of Tewkesbury’s most used alleys, but one of the saddest. The entrance of the alley was destroyed when the High St frontage was pulled down to make way for a new Post Office. The alley was replaced by a brutal concrete tunnel through ...

Old Post Office Alley


In about 1870 the Post Office at 127 High Street closed and moved to Church Street. The alley alongside it became Old Post Office Alley. Confusingly, the lane alongside the Church Street premises is Post Office Lane. The Post Office itself has moved three ...

Wakeley's and Chandler's Courts


Giles Geastwas a mercer, living in Tewkesbury in the sixteenth century. He seems to have profited hugely from the sale of monastery property at the dissolution, and had a social conscience. He left twenty two houses in trust for the benefit of the ...

Bleach Yard


In 1810, W Moore and Son advertised Nathaniel Chandler’s house for sale by auction. It was described as a ‘very substantial brick-built front dwelling house immediately opposite the Town Hall’. There was a little hyperbole in this description. The ...

Other places

Tewkesbury Buildings and Places


These articles are about specific buildings and places in Tewkesbury. They are divided into the three principle streets, High Street, Church Street and Barton Street; the alley's and courts connecting them and finally places elsewhere in the vicinity. <...

Tewkesbury's Alleys


Tewkesbury has a unique town pattern based on the three main roads hemmed between the Avon river and the Swilgate stream. Access to the land from the streets created gaps between the buildings which turned into alley ways. These right's of access allowed ...

The Abbey


Medium: Copper engraving
Artist: Buck, Simon and Nathaniel
Engraver: Buck, Simon and Nathaniel
Date: 1731
Dimensions: 188 x 354 mm

Maps


Williams Dyde's map published in The History and Antiquities of Tewkesbury, 1790 This is the first detailed map that exists before Ordnance Survey began mapping Britain.
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Medieval Development of Tewkesbury


Reproduced from the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society Transactions, Volume CV, 1997, from the article 'Excavations at Holm Hill, Tewkesbury' The plan of Tewkesbury, illustrated below, embodies different patterns and forms ...

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