Tewkesbury Buildings and Places

These articles are about specific buildings and places in Tewkesbury. They are divided into the three principle streets, High Street, Church Street and Barton Street; the alley's and courts connecting them and finally places elsewhere in the vicinity.

We hope to have deeds on every house eventually!

If you have historical deeds and would like to contribute them to our site, please get in touch.

Tewkesbury's Alleys


Tewkesbury has a unique town pattern based on the three main roads hemmed between the Avon river and the Swilgate stream. Access to the land from the streets created gaps between the buildings which turned into alley ways. These right's of access allowed ...

Church Street


This stunning view of the town, as seen from the very top of the tower of Tewkesbury Abbey, was taken in 1936 as part of the publicity for the appeal to raise funds for the restoration of the tower. The man on the ladder is is Jack Day, one of the ...

Medieval Development of Tewkesbury


Reproduced from the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society Transactions, Volume CV, 1997, from the article 'Excavations at Holm Hill, Tewkesbury' The plan of Tewkesbury, illustrated below, embodies different patterns and forms ...

High Street


House in the High Street, or the "nodding gables", next to the Swan Inn, as it was then.  Stone lithograph by W.Walton, printed by Charles Hullmandell for M.Habershon, published in 1836

Some Glimpses Of Tewkesbury In 1540


On 12 January 1540 the keys of the Abhey of Tewkesbury were passed over to Robert Southwell , or another of King Henry VIII's commissioners, and the last monks departed from the buildings. Soon builders would arrive with ladders and start stripping ...

The Cinema in Tewkesbury


Diamond Jubilee Year, 18 September 1897, just one year after the first public showing of animated pictures in England, and the jerky figures of Bob Fitzsimmonds and Gentleman Jim Corbett flickered across the screen before a fascinated audience of ...

King John's Bridge


The rivers among which Tewkesbury lies were a considerable obstacle to land communications, and to some extent the town's situation near places at which it was possible to cross the rivers, especially the Avon, but also the Swilgate and the other streams, ...

A Visit to Forthampton Court


Forthampton Court[1], which in 1991 [2012] is still a family home, provides an excellent insight into the development of architecture as an outward symptom of the passage of time. Successive owners have imprinted on the house their own ...

Preserving the Memory of Livestock Markets in Tewkesbury


This article was inspired by a request from the Civic Society, which wishes to place a plaque on the wall of the building that today houses a tax hire firm in Oldbury Road. It also enabled the use of photographs of Hone the Auctioneer, kindly made available ...

Buildings and places on the High Street, Tewkesbury

The Anchor Inn


For centuries Tewkesbury was an important market town situated at the confluence of the Rivers Avon and Severn, although it was not until 1826 that the ferries crossing the Severn were replaced by a bridge. During the age of the horse, apart from ...

114 High Street


This Archive starts in 1726 with the property being owned by John Mansell of Evesham, a baker selling it to Henry Welsh (otherwise Welch) of Tewkesbury, a maltster for £200. In May 1737 Henry Welsh mortgaged for £200 - A parcel of ...

117-118 High Street


The papers within this Accession No. show that originally the property was part of the estate of Sir William Codrington who devised in his Will of 1789 to the use of Sir Christopher Bethell Codrington as 1st tenant for life - with it being lawful ...

43-44 High Street


The Documents and papers within this accession number show that these houses were originally part of an estate of William Ridler and his wife. In 1708 the estate consisting of houses in Key Lane [6 tenants named] and a parcel of meadow called ...

Tudor House Hotel


Tewkesbury is a living museum with more than five hundred years of architecture, and was listed by the Council of British Archaeology as one of fifty-one historic towns which are ‘so splendid and so precious that the ultimate responsibility for them ...

29 High Street


The documents in this archive refer to houses in High Street – they were donated as referring to “The New Inn” 28 High Street but were found to also refer to houses either side giving names of owners and occupiers to abutments. The Archive came to the ...

28 High Street


The documents in this archive refer to houses in High Street – they were donated as referring to “The New Inn” 28 High Street but were found to also refer to houses either side giving names of owners and occupiers to abutments. The Archive came to the ...

27 High Street


The documents in this archive refer to houses in High Street – they were donated as referring to “The New Inn” 28 High Street but were found to also refer to houses either side giving names of owners and occupiers to abutments. The Archive came to the ...

Buildings and places on Church Street, Tewkesbury

86 Church Street


This house is a Georgian building and is about eight feet wide.  The 1801 Tewkesbury Poor Book states a Joseph Bishop lived here paying £5 10s rent and 5s 6d rates. From 1851 is was the home of boot-makers, first mentioned was Thomas ...

91-92 Church Street - The Old Curiosity Shop


Tourism in Tewkesbury clearly benefits from the buildings featured in the novels of Charles Dickens , Mrs. Craik and John Moore‘s ‘Brensham Trilogy ', based on Tewkesbury and the surrounding area. Researchers, however, can only ...

89-90 Church Street and the Vaulted Cellar Beneath


This article was original published inside the larger article about 91-92 Church Street - The Old Curiosity Shop Permission was obtained from the owners of Elizabethan Pine to carry out ...

82-83 Church Street


An exceptionally fine and well-preserved medieval town house. Pair of houses in row. Late C15 or early C16. Late C16/17 rear wing, extended late C18/C19. Close studded framing with plaster infill to front, heavy box framing ...

The Old Hat Shop


The Hat Shop in Church Street, one of the old houses in Tewkesbury which has often been drawn and photographed, is older than it seems. On the street front it is apparently a later seventeenth century timber-framed building. At the side, over the archway ...

66 Church Street


"This is a Grade II listed building and includes No. 36 St. Mary's Lane. It is a mid-16th century timber framed building, tension braced with plaster panels. The first floor is jettied and it has a steep tiled roof with gable ends. There are two ...

74 Church Street


From Linnell :  Listed Grade II 18th century stuccoed brick front with parapet to timber frame. 3 storeys. 1 window, sashes in exposed moulded cases, no glazing bars. Brick chimney rising from parapet on left. Early 18th century ...

Berkeley Arms, 8 Church Street


Probably one of the most well known and well liked pubs in Tewkesbury (website www.berkeleyarms.pub), it has a low key atmosphere good for conversations. Speciality food are very good pies. There are two ...

The Old Baptist Chapel


Starting life in the fifteenth century as a medieval house, it was a roomy dwelling for an affluent Tewkesbury family. It is thought that by the mid-seventeenth century, the house had become the location for a Nonconformist group, the Baptists, to hold ...

Buildings and places on Barton Street, Tewkesbury

77 Barton Street


Visitors walking down the alleys which run from Barton Street to the Swilgate may sometimes pause to wonder how they came by their names. One such alley is Compton's, by the side of 'The Wool Basket', the shop which now occupies 77, Barton Street. It ...

3 Barton Street, once The Globe Inn


At an auction in Tewkesbury earlier this year an item in the catalogue was described as ‘Sundry Deeds ’. It turned out to be a box of documents relating to No. 3 Barton Street. Having attended most of the local auctions, I was unhappy at missing ...

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